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Randomized Controlled Trials of Interventions Addressing Intimate Partner Violence in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review.

Authors
  • Cork, Cliodhna1
  • White, Ross1, 2
  • Noel, Pia1, 3
  • Bergin, Niamh1
  • 1 Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland.
  • 2 Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 3 School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Trauma Violence & Abuse
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
21
Issue
4
Pages
643–659
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1524838018784585
PMID: 29962286
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrated by males is the most prevalent form of violence against women across the globe. A systematic review was carried out to identify published randomized controlled trials of interventions aiming to prevent or reduce IPV in Sub-Saharan Africa. Details were sought on the interventions, outcomes, and risk of bias in evaluations. Articles were identified by searching MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, and PsycInfo. The search included terms pertaining to IPV, the research design, and the target geographical region. To be included, studies needed to have assessed the impact of an intervention on reported incidence, prevalence of IPV, or measures of related attitudes and behaviors. Fifteen papers were included in the final review. Risk of bias was evaluated using the Cochrane Library "Risk of Bias" tool. Findings suggest that interventions have the potential to reduce IPV-related behaviors and attitudes. Certain types of IPV were more amenable to change than others. Higher levels of efficacy were identified in interventions that had longer follow-up, addressed IPV as a main aim, and occurred at the community level or multiple levels of the social ecology. Findings should be interpreted in light of varying risks of bias. Suggestions are made for future research and practice.

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