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Inspiratory speech as a management option for spastic dysphonia. Case study.

Authors
  • Harrison, G A
  • Davis, P J
  • Troughear, R H
  • Winkworth, A L
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology
Publication Date
May 01, 1992
Volume
101
Issue
5
Pages
375–382
Identifiers
PMID: 1570932
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

A case study is reported of a subject who has used inspiratory speech (IS) for 6 years as a means of overcoming the communication problems of long-standing adductor spastic dysphonia (ASD). The subject was studied to confirm his use of IS, determine the mechanisms of its production, investigate its effects on ventilatory gas exchange, and confirm that it was perceptually preferable to ASD expiratory speech (ES). Results showed that the production and control of a high laryngeal resistance to airflow were necessary for usable IS. Voice quality was quantitatively and perceptually poor; however, the improved fluency and absence of phonatory spasm made IS the preferred speaking mode for both the listener and the speaker. Transcutaneous measurements of the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the subject's blood were made during extended speaking periods. These measurements indicated that ventilation was unchanged during IS, and that ventilation during ES was similar to the "hyperventilation" state of normal speakers. The reasons for the absence of phonatory spasm during IS are discussed, and the possibility of its use as a noninvasive management option for other ASD sufferers is addressed.

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