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Insecticidal and Antifeedant Activities of Malagasy Medicinal Plant ( Cinnamosma sp.) Extracts and Drimane-Type Sesquiterpenes against Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes

Authors
  • Inocente, Edna Alfaro1
  • Nguyen, Bao1
  • Manwill, Preston K.2, 3
  • Benatrehina, Annecie2
  • Kweka, Eliningaya4
  • Wu, Sijin2
  • Cheng, Xiaolin2
  • Rakotondraibe, L. Harinantenaina2, 3
  • Piermarini, Peter M.1, 3
  • 1 (B.N.)
  • 2 (X.C.)
  • 3 Center for Applied Plant Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
  • 4 Division of Livestock and Human Disease Vector Control, Tropical Pesticides Research Institute, Arusha P.O. Box 3024, Tanzania
Type
Published Article
Journal
Insects
Publisher
MDPI
Publication Date
Oct 25, 2019
Volume
10
Issue
11
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/insects10110373
PMID: 31731570
PMCID: PMC6920793
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

The overuse of insecticides with limited modes of action has led to resistance in mosquito vectors. Thus, insecticides with novel modes of action are needed. Secondary metabolites in Madagascan plants of the genus Cinnamosma (Canellaceae) are commonly used in traditional remedies and known to elicit antifeedant and toxic effects in insect pests. Here we test the hypothesis that extracts of Cinnamosma sp. enriched in drimane sesquiterpenes are toxic and/or antifeedant to the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti . We show that the bark and root extracts, which contain a higher abundance of drimane sesquiterpenes compared to leaves, were the most efficacious. Screening isolated compounds revealed cinnamodial to be the primary driver of adulticidal activity, whereas cinnamodial, polygodial, cinnafragrin A, and capsicodendrin contributed to the larvicidal activity. Moreover, an abundant lactone (cinnamosmolide) in the root extract synergized the larvicidal effects of cinnamodial. The antifeedant activity of the extracts was primarily contributed to cinnamodial, polygodial, and cinnamolide. Parallel experiments with warburganal isolated from Warburgia ugandensis (Canellaceae) revealed that aldehydes are critical for—and a hydroxyl modulates—insecticidal activity. Our results indicate that plant drimane sesquiterpenes provide valuable chemical platforms for developing insecticides and repellents to control mosquito vectors.

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