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Input integration around the dendritic branches in hippocampal dentate granule cells.

Authors
  • Kamijo, Tadanobu Chuyo1
  • Hayakawa, Hirofumi1
  • Fukushima, Yasuhiro2
  • Kubota, Yoshiyuki3
  • Isomura, Yoshikazu1
  • Tsukada, Minoru1
  • Aihara, Takeshi1
  • 1 Graduate School of Brain Sciences, Tamagawa University, 6-1-1 Tamagawagakuen, Machida, Tokyo 194-8610 Japan. , (Japan)
  • 2 Faculty of Health and Welfare, Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare, Kurashiki, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 3 National Institute for Physiological Science, Okazaki, Japan. , (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cognitive neurodynamics
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2014
Volume
8
Issue
4
Pages
267–276
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11571-014-9280-6
PMID: 25009669
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that the dendrites of several neurons are not simple translators but are crucial facilitators of excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) propagation and summation of synaptic inputs to compensate for inherent voltage attenuation. Granule cells (GCs)are located at the gateway for valuable information arriving at the hippocampus from the entorhinal cortex. However, the underlying mechanisms of information integration along the dendrites of GCs in the hippocampus are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the input integration around dendritic branches of GCs in the rat hippocampus. We applied differential spatiotemporal stimulations to the dendrites using a high-speed glutamate-uncaging laser. Our results showed that when two sites close to and equidistant from a branching point were simultaneously stimulated, a nonlinear summation of EPSPs was observed at the soma. In addition, nonlinear summation (facilitation) depended on the stimulus location and was significantly blocked by the application of a voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel antagonist. These findings suggest that the nonlinear summation of EPSPs around the dendritic branches of hippocampal GCs is a result of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel activation and may play a crucial role in the integration of input information.

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