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Inpatient care experiences differ by preferred language within racial/ethnic groups.

Authors
  • Quigley, Denise D1
  • Elliott, Marc N1
  • Hambarsoomian, Katrin1
  • Wilson-Frederick, Shondelle M2
  • Lehrman, William G3
  • Agniel, Denis1
  • Ng, Judy H4
  • Goldstein, Elizabeth H3
  • Giordano, Laura A5
  • Martino, Steven C6
  • 1 RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California.
  • 2 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Office of Minority Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
  • 3 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Baltimore, Maryland.
  • 4 National Committee for Quality Assurance, Washington, District of Columbia.
  • 5 Health Services Advisory Group, Phoenix, Arizona.
  • 6 RAND Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Health services research
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2019
Volume
54 Suppl 1
Pages
263–274
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/1475-6773.13105
PMID: 30613960
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To describe differences in patient experiences of hospital care by preferred language within racial/ethnic groups. 2014-2015 HCAHPS survey data. We compared six composite measures for seven languages (English, Spanish, Russian, Portuguese, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Other) within applicable subsets of five racial/ethnic groups (Hispanics, Asian/Pacific Islanders, American Indian/Alaska Natives, Blacks, and Whites). We measured patient-mix adjusted overall, between- and within-hospital differences in patient experience by language, using linear regression. Surveys from 5 480 308 patients discharged from 4517 hospitals 2014-2015. Within each racial/ethnic group, mean reported experiences for non-English-preferring patients were almost always worse than their English-preferring counterparts. Language differences were largest and most consistent for Care Coordination. Within-hospital differences by language were often larger than between-hospital differences and were largest for Care Coordination. Where between-hospital differences existed, non-English-preferring patients usually attended hospitals whose average patient experience scores for all patients were lower than the average scores for the hospitals of their English-preferring counterparts. Efforts should be made to increase access to better hospitals for language minorities and improve care coordination and other facets of patient experience in hospitals with high proportions of non-English-preferring patients, focusing on cultural competence and language-appropriate services. © 2019 The Authors. Health Services Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Health Research and Educational Trust.

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