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An Innovative, Prospective, Hybrid Cohort-Cluster Study Design to Characterize Dengue Virus Transmission in Multigenerational Households in Kamphaeng Phet, Thailand.

Authors
  • Anderson, Kathryn B
  • Buddhari, Darunee
  • Srikiatkhachorn, Anon
  • Gromowski, Gregory D
  • Iamsirithaworn, Sopon
  • Weg, Alden L
  • Ellison, Damon W
  • Macareo, Louis
  • Cummings, Derek A T
  • Yoon, In-Kyu
  • Nisalak, Ananda
  • Ponlawat, Alongkot
  • Thomas, Stephen J
  • Fernandez, Stefan
  • Jarman, Richard G
  • Rothman, Alan L
  • Endy, Timothy P
Type
Published Article
Journal
American journal of epidemiology
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2020
Volume
189
Issue
7
Pages
648–659
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwaa008
PMID: 31971570
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Difficulties inherent in the identification of immune correlates of protection or severe disease have challenged the development and evaluation of dengue vaccines. There persist substantial gaps in knowledge about the complex effects of age and sequential dengue virus (DENV) exposures on these correlations. To address these gaps, we were conducting a novel family-based cohort-cluster study for DENV transmission in Kamphaeng Phet, Thailand. The study began in 2015 and is funded until at least 2023. As of May 2019, 2,870 individuals in 485 families were actively enrolled. The families comprise at least 1 child born into the study as a newborn, 1 other child, a parent, and a grandparent. The median age of enrolled participants is 21 years (range 0-93 years). Active surveillance is performed to detect acute dengue illnesses, and annual blood testing identifies subclinical seroconversions. Extended follow-up of this cohort will detect sequential infections and correlate antibody kinetics and sequence of infections with disease outcomes. The central goal of this prospective study is to characterize how different DENV exposure histories within multigenerational family units, from DENV-naive infants to grandparents with multiple prior DENV exposures, affect transmission, disease, and protection at the level of the individual, household, and community. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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