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Innominate artery occlusive disease: surgical approach and long-term results.

Authors
  • Reul, G J
  • Jacobs, M J
  • Gregoric, I D
  • Calderon, M
  • Duncan, J M
  • Ott, D A
  • Livesay, J J
  • Cooley, D A
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Vascular Surgery
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Sep 01, 1991
Volume
14
Issue
3
Pages
405–412
Identifiers
PMID: 1831864
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

We reviewed our experience with 54 patients who underwent innominate artery revascularization during a 10-year period. Their age range was from 16 to 75 years (mean, 49.8 years). The innominate artery alone was involved in 21 patients (39%); the remaining patients had additional arch vessel obstructions. Before operation, neurologic symptoms occurred in 25 patients (46%), arm ischemia related to claudication and microembolization occurred in 8 patients (14%), a combination of symptoms occurred in 17 patients (32%), and no symptoms were noted in 4 patients (8%). The extrathoracic approach to surgery was used in 16 patients (30%). Eleven of the 38 patients in whom the intrathoracic approach was used had endarterectomy of the innominate artery; in three of those, the procedure was combined with left common carotid endarterectomy. Bypass grafts were used in the other 27 patients undergoing procedures with an intrathoracic approach; in six of those, bypass was combined with carotid endarterectomy. No operative deaths occurred. Perioperative revascularization failure occurred in four cases; all of those patients underwent a second revascularization procedure, with a secondary patency rate of 100%. In four patients, late occlusion was noted at 6 months and at 1, 1.5, and 10 years. One patient had a permanent perioperative neurologic deficit in the distribution of the left carotid artery after a combined common carotid endarterectomy/innominate endarterectomy procedure. No neurologic deficits were directly related to the innominate artery territory. Long-term actuarial survival was 83% at 10 years. Early and late graft failures were related to inadequate inflow in bypass grafts, progression of distal disease in arteritis, and primary closure in endarterectomy.

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