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Innate immune defenses induced by CpG do not promote vaccine-induced protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus in pigs.

Authors
  • Alves, M P
  • Guzylack-Piriou, L
  • Juillard, V
  • Audonnet, J-C
  • Doel, T
  • Dawson, H
  • Golde, W T
  • Gerber, H
  • Peduto, N
  • McCullough, K C
  • Summerfield, A
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical and vaccine immunology : CVI
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2009
Volume
16
Issue
8
Pages
1151–1157
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1128/CVI.00018-09
PMID: 19553550
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Emergency vaccination as part of the control strategies against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has the potential to limit virus spread and reduce large-scale culling. To reduce the time between vaccination and the onset of immunity, immunostimulatory CpG was tested for its capacity to promote early protection against FMDV challenge in pigs. To this end, CpG 2142, an efficient inducer of alpha interferon, was injected intramuscularly. Increased transcription of Mx1, OAS, and IRF-7 was identified as a sensitive measurement of CpG-induced innate immunity, with increased levels detectable to at least 4 days after injection of CpG formulated with Emulsigen. Despite this, CpG combined with an FMD vaccine did not promote protection. Pigs vaccinated 2 days before challenge had disease development, which was at least as acute as that of unvaccinated controls. All pigs vaccinated 7 days before challenge were protected without a noticeable effect of CpG. In summary, our results demonstrate the caution required when translating findings from mouse models to natural hosts of FMDV.

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