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Initial size of unilateral pleural effusion determines impact of thoracocentesis on oxygenation.

Authors
  • Michaelides, Stylianos A1
  • Bablekos, George D2, 3
  • Analitis, Antonis4
  • Michailidis, Avgerinos-Romanos1, 2
  • Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos A3
  • Koulouris, Nikolaos5
  • 1 Department of Occupational Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis, 'Sismanogleio - Amalia Fleming' General Hospital, Maroussi, Greece. , (Greece)
  • 2 Departmentof Medical Laboratories, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Athens, Faculty of Health and Caring Professions, Athens, Greece. , (Greece)
  • 3 Department of Physiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. , (Greece)
  • 4 Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. , (Greece)
  • 5 First Department of Thoracic Medicine, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Hospital for Diseases of the Chest (Sotiria), Athens, Greece. , (Greece)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Postgraduate Medical Journal
Publisher
BMJ
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2017
Volume
93
Issue
1105
Pages
691–695
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1136/postgradmedj-2017-134854
PMID: 28442619
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Patients with smaller effusions showed a small improvement in their oxygenation 48 hours post-thoracocentesis (T3). Patients with larger effusions exhibited a transient reduction in their oxygenation immediately after fluid removal (T2).

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