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Inhibitory effect of human interferons on lymphocyte proliferation induced by phytomitogens in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
International archives of allergy and applied immunology
Publication Date
Volume
72
Issue
4
Pages
316–324
Identifiers
PMID: 6196301
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

In order to study the comparative cross-reactivity of human interferon (Hu-IFN) with cynomolgus monkeys, the effect of Hu-IFN on the immune responses of monkeys was assessed by measuring lymphocyte transformation induced by phytomitogens. The in vivo administration of Hu-IFN or its placebo to monkeys resulted in transient neutrophilia, but no significant alteration of the kinetics of T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. Lymphocyte proliferation of Hu-IFN-injected monkeys showed a significant reduction depending on their serum Hu-IFN titers, whereas no significant decrease was observed in monkeys injected with placebo. The in vitro incubation of monkey lymphocytes with Hu-IFN before or simultaneously with the addition of phytomitogens caused a substantial decrease in the lymphocyte proliferative responses in a dose-dependent manner. However, the inhibitory effect was no longer observed when Hu-IFN was added 24 h after incubation of lymphocytes with phytomitogens. Hu-IFN also suppressed the blastogenic responses of lymphocytes pulsed with phytomitogens before the addition of Hu-IFN. Addition of peritoneal macrophages pretreated with Hu-IFN failed to exert any significantly different effect on the lymphocyte proliferation compared to untreated ones. Taken together, the inhibitory effect of Hu-IFN seemed to act directly upon the early phase of lymphocyte proliferation induced by phytomitogens. These findings indicate that cynomolgus monkeys were susceptible to Hu-IFN both in vitro and in vivo with respect to the inhibitory effect on lymphocyte proliferation and could serve as a useful experimental model to study the effect of Hu-IFN on the immune responses.

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