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Inhibition of protein synthesis in LLC-PK1 cells increases calcitonin-induced plasminogen-activator gene transcription and mRNA stability.

Authors
  • Altus, M S
  • Pearson, D
  • Horiuchi, A
  • Nagamine, Y
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Biochemical journal
Publication Date
Mar 01, 1987
Volume
242
Issue
2
Pages
387–392
Identifiers
PMID: 3593259
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The peptide hormone calcitonin induces the accumulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) mRNA in pig kidney LLC-PK1 cells. By itself, inhibition of protein synthesis had a negligible effect on uPA mRNA accumulation. Inhibition of protein synthesis led to two superinductive effects: an increase in calcitonin-induced uPA mRNA accumulation over time, and a shift in the dose-response curve so that lower calcitonin doses became more potent. To explain these two superinductive effects of protein-synthesis inhibition on calcitonin treatment, we demonstrated that the inhibition of protein synthesis increased both calcitonin-induced uPA-gene transcription and uPA-mRNA stability. Different protein-synthesis inhibitors had similar actions, arguing against the possibility that the results were attributable to an anomalous action of a particular inhibitor. The superinductive effects of protein-synthesis inhibition could not be mimicked when a tumour promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), was used instead of calcitonin as an inducer. Calcitonin and TPA exert their effects through different pathways, suggesting a clue to the mechanism of superinduction. Although inhibition of protein synthesis has been reported to increase transcription and mRNA stability in a number of other systems, the one described here appeared unique in combining both effects in the context of hormonal regulation.

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