Inhibition of ascorbic-acid-induced depolymerization of hyaluronic acid by ceruloplasmin in synovial fluid.

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Inhibition of ascorbic-acid-induced depolymerization of hyaluronic acid by ceruloplasmin in synovial fluid.

Publication Date
Jan 01, 1968
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Political Science
  • Religious Science
License
Unknown

Abstract

FCS8702 Facts About Vitamin C1 Linda B. Bobroff and Isabel Valentín-Oquendo2 1. This document is FCS8702, one of a series of the Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date June 2001. Revised January 2014. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/. 2. Linda B. Bobroff, PhD, RD, LD/N, professor, and Isabel Valentin-Oquendo, MS, RD, LD/N, former assistant and curriculum coordinator, Foods and Nutrition, Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, UF/IFAS Extension, Gainesville, FL 32611. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county’s UF/IFAS Extension office. U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension. Why do we need vitamin C? Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, has a wide variety of uses in the body. It helps to slow down or prevent cell damage. It is needed to maintain healthy body tissues and the immune system. Vitamin C also helps the body absorb iron from plant foods. What happens if we don’t get enough vitamin C? Vitamin C is found in many foods we eat and deficiency is rare. Scurvy, the disease caused by vitamin C deficiency, was common generations ago. Seamen who lived at sea for months at a time and ate no fresh fruits or vegetables often got scurvy. Today, scurvy is rare in the U.S., but not getting enough vitamin C may lead to anemia, bleeding gums, infect

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