Affordable Access

deepdyve-link deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Inhibition of angiogenesis and the angiogenesis/invasion shift.

Authors
  • Bikfalvi, Andreas
  • Moenner, Michel
  • Javerzat, Sophie
  • North, Sophie
  • Hagedorn, Martin
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biochemical Society Transactions
Publisher
Portland Press
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2011
Volume
39
Issue
6
Pages
1560–1564
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1042/BST20110710
PMID: 22103487
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Angiogenesis has become a major target in cancer therapy. However, current therapeutic strategies have their limitations and raise several problems. In most tumours, anti-angiogenesis treatment targeting VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) has only limited overall survival benefit compared with conventional chemotherapy alone, and reveals several specific forms of resistance to anti-VEGF treatment. There is growing evidence that anti-VEGF treatment may induce tumour cell invasion by selecting highly invasive tumour cells or hypoxia-resistant cells, or by up-regulating angiogenic alternative pathways such as FGFs (fibroblast growth factors) or genes triggering new invasive programmes. We have identified new genes up-regulated during glioma growth on the chick CAM (chorioallantoic membrane). Our results indicate that anti-angiogenesis treatment in the experimental glioma model drives expression of critical genes which relate to disease aggressiveness in glioblastoma patients. We have identified a molecular mechanism in tumour cells that allows the switch from an angiogenic to invasive programme. Furthermore, we are focusing our research on alternative inhibitors that act, in part, independently of VEGF. These are endogenous molecules that play a role in the control of tumour growth and may constitute a starting point for further development of novel therapeutic or diagnostic tools.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times