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How Does Approaching a Lead Vehicle and Monitoring Request Affect Drivers' Takeover Performance? A Simulated Driving Study with Functional MRI.

Authors
  • Li, Chimou1
  • Li, Xiaonan2
  • Lv, Ming1
  • Chen, Feng2
  • Ma, Xiaoxiang3
  • Zhang, Lin4
  • 1 CCCC Wenshan Highway Construction & Development Co., Ltd., Wenshan 663000, China. , (China)
  • 2 The Key Laboratory of Road and Traffic Engineering, Ministry of Education, Tongji University, 4800 Cao'an Road, Jiading, Shanghai 201804, China. , (China)
  • 3 School of Transportation and Logistics Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 611756, China. , (China)
  • 4 Shanghai Municipal Engineering Design Institute (Group) Co., Ltd., Shanghai 200437, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Dec 31, 2021
Volume
19
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph19010412
PMID: 35010671
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

With the popularization and application of conditionally automated driving systems, takeover requirements are becoming more and more frequent, and the subsequent takeover safety problems have attracted attention. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology, combined with driving simulation experiments, to study in depth the effects of critical degree and monitor request (MR) 30 s in advance on drivers' visual behavior, takeover performance and brain activation. Results showed that MR can effectively improve the driver's visual and takeover performance, including visual reaction times, fixation frequency and duration, takeover time, and takeover mode. The length of the reserved safety distance can significantly affect the distribution of longitudinal acceleration. Critical or non-critical takeover has a significant impact on the change of pupil diameter and the standard deviation of lateral displacement. Five brain regions, including the middle occipital gyrus (MOG), fusiform gyrus (FG), middle temporal gyrus (MTG), precuneus and precentral, are activated under the stimulation of a critical takeover scenario, and are related to cognitive behaviors such as visual cognition, distance perception, memory search and movement association.

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