Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Influences of Methodological Decisions on Assessing the Spatiotemporal Stability of Speech Movement Sequences.

Authors
  • Wisler, Alan1
  • Goffman, Lisa2
  • Zhang, Ling3
  • Wang, Jun4, 5
  • 1 Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Utah State University, Logan.
  • 2 Callier Center for Communication Disorders, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, The University of Texas at Dallas.
  • 3 Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego, CA.
  • 4 Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin.
  • 5 Department of Neurology, Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
Publication Date
Feb 09, 2022
Volume
65
Issue
2
Pages
538–554
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1044/2021_JSLHR-21-00298
PMID: 35077649
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The spatiotemporal index (STI) is a widely used approach for measuring speech pattern stability across multiple repetitions of a stimulus. In this study, we examine how methodological choices in the implementation of the STI (including the number of repetitions, length of stimuli, and parsing procedure) can affect its value. To evaluate how each methodological decision affects the STI, we use a synthetic data framework that allows for the generation of random productions of the template phrase "Buy Bobby a Puppy" at different stability levels. Within this framework, we conduct three experiments: Experiment 1 investigates the effects of the number of repetitions, Experiment 2 investigates the effects of stimulus length, and Experiment 3 investigates the effects of parsing errors. In Experiment 1, we observed that STI values based on fewer repetitions will systematically underestimate larger repetition estimates. Experiment 2 showed that STI values will tend to be higher when calculated on longer (multimovement) stimuli independent of any differences in the stability of the underlying speech patterns. Finally, in Experiment 3, we showed that even minor parsing errors (≈ 10 ms) increase the value of the STI. The results of this study illustrate that even minor choices in the implementation of the STI can have a noticeable impact on the resulting value. These findings highlight the care that needs to be taken when designing studies and comparing STI values across studies to ensure that different STI values are capturing real differences in motion pattern stability rather than trivial methodological variation.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times