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Influences of augmented reality head-worn display type and user interface design on performance and usability in simulated warehouse order picking.

Authors
  • Kim, Sunwook1
  • Nussbaum, Maury A2
  • Gabbard, Joseph L1
  • 1 Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, USA.
  • 2 Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, USA; School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Applied ergonomics
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2019
Volume
74
Pages
186–193
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.apergo.2018.08.026
PMID: 30487099
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Limited information is available regarding the effective use of workplace head-worn displays (HWD), especially the choices of HWD types and user interface (UI) designs. We explored how different HWD types and UI designs affect perceived workload, usability, visual discomfort, and job performance during a simulated warehouse job involving order picking and part assembly. Sixteen gender-balanced participants completed the simulated job in all combinations of two HWD types (binocular vs. monocular) and four UIs, the latter of which manipulated information mode (text-vs. graphic-based) and information availability (always-on vs. on-demand); a baseline condition was also completed (paper pick list). Job performance, workload, and usability were more affected by UI designs than HWD type. For example, the graphic-based UI reduced job completion time and number of errors by ∼13% and ∼59%, respectively. Participants had no strong preference for either of the HWD types, suggesting that the physical HWD designs tested are suboptimal. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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