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The influence of tumor microfoci on recurrence and survival following pulmonary resection of metastatic osteogenic sarcoma.

Authors
  • Gundry, S R
  • Coran, A G
  • Lemmer, J
  • Wesley, J R
  • Hutchinson, R
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Nov 01, 1984
Volume
38
Issue
5
Pages
473–478
Identifiers
PMID: 6594081
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Factors that influence recurrence and survival following thoracotomy for metastatic osteogenic sarcoma are not well defined. We examined the clinical and pathological material from 51 patients who had no metastases at the time of operative treatment of osteogenic sarcoma at the University of Michigan from 1962 to 1982. Ages ranged from 2 to 30 years (mean, 15 years). Metastases developed in 37 patients (72.5%) at a mean of 8 months after initial operation. Thirteen patients were treated with chemotherapy only; 12 of them died after a mean survival of 7 months. Twenty-four patients were treated with chemotherapy and 45 thoracotomies (mean, 1.9 per patient; range, 1 to 5) during which 120 wedge resections or lobectomies were performed. Follow-up is available on 22 of these 24 patients, 11 (50%) of whom are alive (9, tumor free) at a mean of 51 months after thoracotomy. Eleven patients died after a mean survival of 27 months (p less than or equal to 0.001 compared with the group having chemotherapy only). Microfoci of tumor (tumor cells separate from the gross tumor nodule) were found in resection specimens in 12 patients at the first thoracotomy; in 11 of these 12 patients, new metastases subsequently developed resulting in 10 reoperations. Twelve patients had no microfoci at the first operation; new metastases developed in 5; 3 underwent reoperation. Overall, microfoci were found at 29 operations; in patients with this finding, new metastases developed twenty-seven times (93%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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