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The influence of intergroup comparisons on Africans' intelligence test performance in a job selection context.

Authors
  • Klein, Olivier
  • Pohl, Sabine
  • Ndagijimana, Chantal
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of psychology
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2007
Volume
141
Issue
5
Pages
453–467
Identifiers
PMID: 17933401
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Sub-Saharan Africans living in Belgium (N = 69) completed a culture-free intelligence test in a simulated job selection environment. Prior to testing, the authors instructed participants that Africans' average performance on this test was generally better (positive comparison), worse (negative comparison), or equal to Belgians' performance. In a control condition, no such information was given. Results indicated that, compared with the equal and control conditions, performance was lower when intergroup comparisons were negative. In the former condition, participants were also more likely to endorse external factors that may account for lower performance. The authors interpreted the findings in line with stereotype threat theory (C. M. Steele & J. Aronson, 1995). In the context of job selection, the validity of intelligence tests conducted with members of stigmatized groups may be affected by the salience of social stereotypes and intergroup social comparisons.

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