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The influence of donated gametes on the incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

Authors
  • Salha, O
  • Sharma, V
  • Dada, T
  • Nugent, D
  • Rutherford, A J
  • Tomlinson, A J
  • Philips, S
  • Allgar, V
  • Walker, J J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Human reproduction (Oxford, England)
Publication Date
Sep 01, 1999
Volume
14
Issue
9
Pages
2268–2273
Identifiers
PMID: 10469693
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Pregnancies achieved from oocyte, sperm or embryo donation are unique, since they have resulted from donor gametes that are immunologically foreign to the mother. Thus, studying the obstetric outcome of such pregnancies may shed some light on the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, particularly in women conceiving with donated embryos, since the entire fetal genome is allogenic in these pregnancies. In this retrospective cohort study, a total of 144 women were studied. Of these, 72 were infertility patients who had conceived as a result of sperm, ovum or embryo donation and the other 72 women were age- and parity-matched control patients who became pregnant with their own gametes, either spontaneously, or following intrauterine insemination with their partner's spermatozoa. Study patients were divided into three groups depending on the origin of the donated gametes. Group 1 consisted of pregnancies achieved by intrauterine insemination with washed donor spermatozoa (n = 33). Group 2 included women who conceived using donated oocytes (n = 27) and group 3 consisted of women who conceived as a result of embryo donation (n = 12). The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension in the donated gametes study group was 12.5% (9/72) compared with 2.8% (2/72) in the control group. In addition, pre-eclampsia was diagnosed in 18.1% (13/72) of the donated gametes study group compared to 1.4% (1/72) in the age- and parity-matched controls. The increased incidence of gestational hypertension in pregnancies resulting from donated gametes gives evidence for a maternal genetic component, with an equally strong fetal influence, in the complicated aetiology of gestational hypertension, and pre-eclampsia in particular.

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