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The influence of age, anthropometrics and range of motion on the morphometry of the synovial folds of the lateral atlanto-axial joints: a pilot study

Authors
  • Webb, Alexandra1
  • Darekar, Angela2
  • Rassoulian, Hamid3
  • 1 University of Southampton, School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Centre for Learning Anatomical Sciences, Mailpoint 845, Tremona Road, Southampton, SO16 6YD, UK , Southampton (United Kingdom)
  • 2 Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Southampton, UK , Southampton (United Kingdom)
  • 3 Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Nottingham, UK , Nottingham (United Kingdom)
Type
Published Article
Journal
European Spine Journal
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Aug 14, 2010
Volume
20
Issue
4
Pages
542–549
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00586-010-1553-0
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of age, anthropometrics and cervical range of motion upon synovial fold volume. Ten healthy female subjects aged 20–40 years were included in the study. Age, height, body mass, dimensions of the head and neck and cervical range of motion of each subject were measured. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the cervical spine were acquired; the volume of the ventral and dorsal synovial folds of the right and the left lateral atlanto-axial joints was measured using seed growing and thresholding methods. Using Spearman’s correlation coefficient, it was determined that there was no correlation between synovial fold volume and age. Synovial fold volume was positively correlated with subject height and neck length but negatively correlated with body mass, body mass index and the circumference of the head and neck. The relationship between synovial fold volume and range of cervical motion varied with the plane of movement. The ability to image the synovial folds of the lateral atlanto-axial joints using MR imaging to determine their normal morphology provides the basis for investigating synovial fold pathology in patients with neck pain and headache.

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