Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Induction and maintenance of a phenotypically heterogeneous lung tissue-resident CD4+ T cell population following BCG immunisation.

Authors
  • Bull, Naomi C1
  • Kaveh, Daryan A2
  • Garcia-Pelayo, M C2
  • Stylianou, Elena3
  • McShane, Helen3
  • Hogarth, Philip J2
  • 1 Vaccine Immunology Team, Department of Bacteriology, Animal & Plant Health Agency (APHA), Addlestone, Surrey KT15 3NB, UK; The Jenner Institute, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Vaccine Immunology Team, Department of Bacteriology, Animal & Plant Health Agency (APHA), Addlestone, Surrey KT15 3NB, UK.
  • 3 The Jenner Institute, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Vaccine
Publication Date
Sep 05, 2018
Volume
36
Issue
37
Pages
5625–5635
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.07.035
PMID: 30097220
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) is the biggest cause of human mortality from an infectious disease. The only vaccine currently available, bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), demonstrates some protection against disseminated disease in childhood but very variable efficacy against pulmonary disease in adults. A greater understanding of protective host immune responses is required in order to aid the development of improved vaccines. Tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM) are a recently-identified subset of T cells which may represent an important component of protective immunity to TB. Here, we demonstrate that intradermal BCG vaccination induces a population of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells within the lung parenchyma which persist for >12 months post-vaccination. Comprehensive flow cytometric analysis reveals this population is phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and shares characteristics with lung vascular and splenic CD4+ T cells. This underlines the importance of utilising the intravascular staining technique for definitive identification of tissue-resident T cells, and also suggests that these anatomically distinct cellular subsets are not necessarily permanently resident within a particular tissue compartment but can migrate between compartments. This lung parenchymal population merits further investigation as a critical component of a protective immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times