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Increased stereotypy in conditional Cxcr4 knockout mice.

Authors
  • Cash-Padgett, Tyler1
  • Sawa, Akira1
  • Jaaro-Peled, Hanna2
  • 1 Department of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, United States. , (United States)
  • 2 Department of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, United States. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neuroscience research
Publication Date
April 2016
Volume
105
Pages
75–79
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.neures.2015.10.001
PMID: 26458529
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Chemokines play important roles in the central nervous system, including mediating neuroinflammation and guiding the intracortical migration of interneurons during development. Alteration in parvalbumin-positive interneurons is a key neuropathological hallmark of multiple mental conditions. We recently reported a significant reduction in the expression of CXCL12 in olfactory neurons from sporadic cases with schizophrenia compared with matched controls, suggesting a role for CXCR4/CXCL12 signaling in mental conditions. Thus, we depleted the chemokine receptor Cxcr4 from mice using the parvalbumin-2A-Cre line. The conditional knockout mice exhibited a unique behavioral phenotype involving increased stereotypy. Stereotypy is observed in many psychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia, autism, and dementia. Thus, the Cxcr4 conditional knockout mice may serve as a model for this symptomatic feature.

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