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Increased production of acute-phase proteins corresponds to the peak parasitaemia of primary malaria infection.

Authors
  • Taylor-Robinson, A W1
  • 1 School of Biology, University of Leeds, Clarendon Way, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Parasitology international
Publication Date
February 2000
Volume
48
Issue
4
Pages
297–301
Identifiers
PMID: 10725693
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Recent studies have implicated non-specific mediators associated with CD4+ T cells of the T helper 1 subset in resistance to experimental malarias. As part of continuing studies into the multifactorial role of nitric oxide and other contributors to the innate immune response in control of acute-phase malaria infection, the production of the acute-phase proteins, caeruloplasmin and serum amyloid P, following infection of naive mice with blood stages of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi was investigated. Levels of both acute-phase proteins in the serum of infected mice were significantly elevated on days 7-12 post-infection compared both to other times of infection, and to background levels detected in uninfected control mice. These times corresponded to the ascending and peak primary parasitaemia, when production of interferon-gamma, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitric oxide is known to be raised. Although it is not apparent whether the production of caeruloplasmin and serum amyloid P has a causal effect in reducing parasitaemia or is simply a by-product of innate immunity, the detection of increased levels of circulating acute-phase proteins may act as a useful surrogate marker of high level parasitaemia, and therefore, of blood-borne malaria pathology.

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