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Incentives help delay marriage among Bangladeshi girls.

Type
Published Article
Journal
Population briefs : reports on Population Council research,
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2000
Volume
6
Issue
2
Identifiers
PMID: 12296253
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

In Bangladesh, especially in the rural areas, education has been affordable only for the wealthy. In view of such a situation, the Bangladesh government instituted two incentive programs. One scheme provides wheat to parents of poor primary school boys and girls, and the other offers scholarship money to female secondary school students. Both programs eliminate school fees and provide free books. Aside from the above, a nongovernmental organization, Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee, administered another program for primary-school students that also provides books and stationery, as well as eliminates fees. This paper assessed the effects of these programs on various aspects of the boys¿ and girls¿ lives. Overall, findings showed that the three programs created significant influence on increasing the number of children who were attending a grade appropriate for their age, although impacts on the number of hours spent in school activities are different. With shorter hours spent in school, depending on grade, children still had the time to make significant contributions to the family economy. Finally, the research shows that the secondary school scholarships had an immediate effect in delaying marriage. If sustained, these delays can have considerable long-term implications for women's status, as early marriages have long been strongly associated with gender inequality.

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