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In vitro characterisation of the anti-intravasative properties of the marine product heteronemin

Authors
  • Kopf, Sabine
  • Viola, Katharina
  • Atanas G. Atanasov
  • Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan
  • Rarova, Lucie
  • Kretschy, Nicole
  • Teichmann, Mathias
  • Vonach, Caroline
  • Saiko, Philipp
  • Giessrigl, Benedikt
  • Huttary, Nicole
  • Raab, Ingrid
  • Krieger, Sigurd
  • Schumacher, Marc
  • Marc Diederich
  • Strnad, Miroslav
  • De Martin, Rainer
  • Szekeres, Thomas
  • Jäger, Walter
  • Dirsch, Verena M.
  • And 4 more
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archives of Toxicology
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Mar 30, 2013
Volume
87
Issue
10
Pages
1861–1861
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00204-013-1045-1
Source
LBMCC
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Metastases destroy the function of infested organs and are the main reason of cancer-related mortality. Heteronemin, a natural product derived from a marine sponge, was tested in vitro regarding its properties to prevent tumour cell intravasation through the lymph-endothelial barrier. In three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures consisting of MCF-7 breast cancer cell spheroids that were placed on lymph-endothelial cell (LEC) monolayers, tumour cell spheroids induce "circular chemorepellent-induced defects" (CCIDs) in the LEC monolayer; 12(S)-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12(S)-HETE) and NF-κB activity are major factors inducing CCIDs, which are entry gates for tumour emboli intravasating the vasculature. This 3D co-culture is a validated model for the investigation of intravasation mechanisms and of drugs preventing CCID formation and hence lymph node metastasis. Furthermore, Western blot analyses, NF-κB reporter, EROD, SELE, 12(S)-HETE, and adhesion assays were performed to investigate the properties of heteronemin. Five micromolar heteronemin inhibited the directional movement of LECs and, therefore, the formation of CCIDs, which were induced by MCF-7 spheroids. Furthermore, heteronemin reduced the adhesion of MCF-7 cells to LECs and suppressed 12(S)-HETE-induced expression of the EMT marker paxillin, which is a regulator of directional cell migration. The activity of CYP1A1, which contributed to CCID formation, was also inhibited by heteronemin. Hence, heteronemin inhibits important mechanisms contributing to tumour intravasation in vitro and should be tested in vivo.

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