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Improvements of symptoms of Alzheimer`s disease by inhibition of the angiotensin system.

Authors
  • Quitterer, Ursula1
  • AbdAlla, Said2
  • 1 Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057, Zurich, Switzerland; Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Medicine, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057, Zürich, Switzerland. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Switzerland)
  • 2 Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057, Zurich, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pharmacological Research
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2020
Volume
154
Pages
104230–104230
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.phrs.2019.04.014
PMID: 30991105
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

With ageing of the global society, the frequency of ageing-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is on the rise worldwide. Currently, there is no cure for AD, and the four drugs approved for AD only have very small effects on AD symptoms. Consequently, there are enormous efforts worldwide to identify new targets for treatment of AD. Approaches that interfere with classical neuropathologic features of AD, such as extracellular senile plaques formed of aggregated amyloid-beta (Abeta), and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau have not been successful so far. In search for a treatment approach of AD, we found that inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) by a centrally acting ACE inhibitor retards symptoms of neurodegeneration, Abeta plaque formation and tau hyperphosphorylation in experimental models of AD. Our approach is currently being investigated in a clinical setting. Initial evidence with AD patients shows that a brain-penetrating ACE inhibitor counteracts the process of neurodegeneration and dementia. Moreover, centrally acting ACE inhibitors given in addition to the standard therapy, cholinesterase inhibition, can improve cognitive function of AD patients for several months. This is one of the most promising results for AD treatment since more than a decade. Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

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