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Improved Quality of Life in A Case of Cerebral Palsy after Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation.

Authors
  • Sharma, Alok
  • Sane, Hemangi
  • Kulkarni, Pooja
  • D'sa, Myola
  • Gokulchandran, Nandini
  • Badhe, Prerna
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cell journal
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2015
Volume
17
Issue
2
Pages
389–394
Identifiers
PMID: 26199918
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a non progressive, demyelinating disorder that affects a child's development and posture and may be associated with sensation, cognition, communication and perception abnormalities. In CP, cerebral white matter is injured resulting in the loss of oligodendrocytes. This causes damage to the myelin and disruption of nerve conduction. Cell therapy is being explored as an alternate therapeutic strategy as there is no treatment currently available for CP. To study the benefits of this treatment we have administered autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) to a 12-year-old CP case. He was clinically re-evaluated after six months and found to demonstrate positive clinical and functional outcomes. His trunk strength, upper limb control, hand functions, walking stability, balance, posture and coordination improved. His ability to perform activities of daily living improved. On repeating the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the score increased from 90 to 113. A repeat positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan of the brain six months after intervention showed progression of the mean standard deviation values towards normalization which correlated to the functional changes. At one year, all clinical improvements have remained. This indicated that cell transplantation may improve quality of life and have a potential for treatment of CP.

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