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[Impotence from the 70's through the 90's: 20 years of evolution of diagnosis and therapy].

Authors
  • Austoni, E
  • Colombo, F
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archivio italiano di urologia, nefrologia, andrologia : organo ufficiale dell'Associazione per la ricerca in urologia = Urological, nephrological, and andrological sciences
Publication Date
Sep 01, 1992
Volume
64
Issue
3
Pages
231–237
Identifiers
PMID: 1439848
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The surgical treatment of vascular impotence has evolved as our understanding of the haemodynamics of erection advanced. In the early Seventies the direct revascularization techniques which create an anastomosis between an artery and the corpora cavernosa came to be so much in use that an era of so-called "pure arteriogenic impotence" seemed to be dawning. An arterial role in the pathogenesis of importance gained increasing support during that decade, as the use of a number of techniques for the diagnostic assessment of penile haemodynamics becomes widespread (Doppler ultrasound, determination of the penile-brachial index, selective hypogastric arteriography, penile radionuclide scan, penile plethysmography). Corpora cavernosa-direct revascularization techniques, such as the Epigastric-Corporal and Femoro-Corporal trans-Saphena anastomoses, were developed, the latter being proposed by Michal in 1973. By the late Seventies, however, most Authors had abandoned these techniques. Severe haemodynamic side-effects, such as uninterrupted intra-cavernous high pressure and attendant permanent tumescence of penis, were found to induce the microfibrosis of erectile tissues and the thrombosis at the site of the anastomosis. In this period, "venous leakage" became, with the advent of cavernosography, a recognized factor in the pathogenesis of impotence. However, the concept of venogenic impotence, characterized as it is by transient erection, and featuring pathological cavernosograms as well as high cavernometric figures, belongs more appropriately to a clinical syndrome and is, therefore far from being unambiguous. Arterial-arterial bypass and selective veins ligation were then introduced to treat cases of "pure" arteriogenic or venogenic insufficiency.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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