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Implications of Seasonal and Regional Abundance Patterns of Daphnia on Surface Water Monitoring and Assessment

Authors
  • Taub, Frieda B.1
  • Wiseman, Carmen D.1
  • 1 University of Washington, School of Fisheries, Seattle, WA , Seattle
Type
Published Article
Journal
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 01, 1998
Volume
51
Issue
1-2
Pages
53–60
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1023/A:1005933824382
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

The seasonal dynamics of Daphnia populations vary regionally throughout the United States. Within the general pattern, Daphnia increase in abundance after the initiation of the spring algal bloom in all lakes, but their subsequent seasonal patterns differ in various climatic regions. Lakes in regions with cooler summers have large-bodied Daphnia populations that tend to persist throughout the summer, although the species dominance may shift. Regions with warmer summers tend to have large-bodied Daphnia populations that decline or are absent through much of the summer. Still warmer water bodies tend to have medium- to small-bodied species that are abundant during spring, but absent most of the summer. Many central Florida lakes lack Daphnia; if Daphnia species are present, they tend to be small-bodied. Daphnia abundance in these water bodies varies, but seems to be independent of temperature. If surface water (lake, pond) sampling is done in all regions during July and August, the impression will be that Daphnia are absent from large segments of the United States. This would be erroneous, because Daphnia are important earlier during the spring and early summer but are likely to be absent during midsummer in some U.S. regions. Year-to-year variation will be superimposed on this regional pattern. Because there are differences in the dates when spring and summer occur, it would be useful to have an index period that would standardize the start of the growing season. The use of the terrestrial onset of greenness, based on remote sensing of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, is suggested as a possible index set point.

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