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Implications of culture of honor theory and research for practitioners and prevention researchers.

Authors
  • Gul, Pelin1
  • Cross, Susan E1
  • Uskul, Ayse K2
  • 1 Department of Psychology.
  • 2 School of Psychology.
Type
Published Article
Journal
The American psychologist
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
76
Issue
3
Pages
502–515
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1037/amp0000653
PMID: 32914994
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Since the seminal publication of Nisbett and Cohen in 1996 linking the higher rates of violence in the Southern United States compared with the Northern United States to a "culture of honor," researchers have paid increasing attention to conceptualizing honor and identifying its underlying psychological mechanisms and its behavioral outcomes. The concern for reputation and other values embedded in culture of honor act as potential sociocultural risk factors for several major social problems in the United States. The aim of this article is to review the recent research on culture of honor and to discuss its societal implications by focusing on 3 pressing social problems: intimate partner aggression, school violence, and reluctance to seek mental health care. Relative to Whites in northern states, White populations in the southern and western states (considered to have cultures of honor) have higher levels of intimate partner violence, more school shootings, and are less likely to seek mental health care. We also briefly review the incidence of these issues among American Latinx groups, another culture of honor. We suggest ways that the scientific findings on culture of honor can enhance prevention and intervention efforts in education, health, and mental health care settings. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).

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