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Impairments of procedures for implementing complex language are due to disruption of frontal attention processes.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS
Publication Date
Volume
12
Issue
2
Pages
236–247
Identifiers
PMID: 16573857
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Production of complex discourse-lengthy, open-ended utterances and narratives-requires intact basic language operations, but it also requires a series of learned procedures for construction of complex, goal-directed communications. The progression of clinical disorders from transcortical motor aphasia to dynamic aphasia to discourse impairments represents a progression of procedural deficits from basic morpho-syntax to complex grammatical structures to narrative and a progression of lesions from posterior frontal to polar and/or lateral frontal to medial frontal. Two cases of impaired utilization of language exemplify the range of impairments from clearly aphasic agrammatic, nonfluency to less and less "aphasic" and more and more executive impairments from transcortical motor aphasia to dynamic aphasia to narrative discourse disorder. The clinical phenomenology of these disorders gradually comes to be more accurately defined in the terminology of executive deficits than that of aphasia. The executive deficits are, in turn, based on impairments in various components of attention. Specific impairments in energizing attention and setting response criteria associated, respectively, with lesions in superior medial and left ventrolateral frontal regions may cause defective recruitment of the procedures of complex language assembly.

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