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Impaired Antiviral Responses to Extracellular Double-Stranded RNA and Cytosolic DNA, but Not to Interferon-α Stimulation, in TRIM56-Deficient Cells

Authors
  • wang;, li dang
Publication Date
Jan 05, 2022
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/v14010089
OAI: oai:mdpi.com:/1999-4915/14/1/89/
Source
MDPI
Keywords
Language
English
License
Green
External links

Abstract

The physiologic function of tripartite motif protein 56 (TRIM56), a ubiquitously expressed E3 ligase classified within the large TRIM protein family, remains elusive. Gene knockdown studies have suggested TRIM56 as a positive regulator of the type I interferon (IFN-I) antiviral response elicited via the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and cyclic GMP–AMP synthase (cGAS)–stimulator of interferon genes (STING) pathways, which detect and respond to danger signals—extracellular double-stranded (ds) RNA and cytosolic dsDNA, respectively. However, to what extent these pathways depend on TRIM56 in human cells is unclear. In addition, it is debatable whether TRIM56 plays a part in controlling the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) resulting from IFN-I based antiviral treatment. In this study, we created HeLa-derived TRIM56 null cell lines by gene editing and used these cell models to comprehensively examine the impact of endogenous TRIM56 on innate antiviral responses. Our results showed that TRIM56 knockout severely undermined the upregulation of ISGs by extracellular dsRNA and that loss of TRIM56 weakened the response to cytosolic dsDNA. ISG induction and ISGylation following IFN-α stimulation, however, were not compromised by TRIM56 deletion. Using a vesicular stomatitis virus-based antiviral bioactivity assay, we demonstrated that IFN-α could efficiently establish an antiviral state in TRIM56 null cells, providing direct evidence that TRIM56 is not required for the general antiviral action of IFN-I. Altogether, these data ascertain the contributions of TRIM56 to TLR3- and cGAS–STING-dependent antiviral pathways in HeLa cells and add to our understanding of the roles this protein plays in innate immunity.

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