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The Impact of Motor Task Conditions on Goal-Directed Arm Reaching Kinematics and Trunk Compensation in Chronic Stroke Survivors.

Authors
  • Girnis, Jaimie1
  • Agag, Tarek2
  • Nobiling, Tobias3
  • Sweet, Vanessa4
  • Kim, Bokkyu5
  • 1 Department of Physical Therapy Education, SUNY Upstate Medical University; College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College Center for Neurorehabilitation, Boston University.
  • 2 Department of Physical Therapy Education, SUNY Upstate Medical University.
  • 3 Department of Physical Therapy Education, SUNY Upstate Medical University; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Rochester Medical Center.
  • 4 Department of Physical Therapy Education, SUNY Upstate Medical University; Rehabilitation Today.
  • 5 Department of Physical Therapy Education, SUNY Upstate Medical University; [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Visualized Experiments
Publisher
MyJoVE Corporation
Publication Date
May 02, 2021
Issue
171
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3791/61940
PMID: 33999019
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Trunk compensation is the most common movement strategy to substitute for upper extremity (UE) motor deficits in chronic stroke survivors. There is a lack of evidence examining how task conditions impact trunk compensation and goal-directed arm reaching kinematics. This protocol aims to investigate the impact of task conditions, including task difficulty and complexity, on goal-directed arm reaching kinematics. Two non-disabled young adults and two chronic stroke survivors with mild UE motor impairment were recruited for testing the protocol. Each participant performed goal-directed arm reaches with four different task conditions (2 task difficulties [large vs. small targets] X 2 task complexities [pointing vs. picking up]). The task goal was to reach and point at a target or pick up an object located 20 cm in front of the home position as quickly as possible with a stylus or a pair of chopsticks, respectively, in response to an auditory cue. Participants performed ten reaches per task condition. A 3-dimensional motion capture camera system was used to record trunk and arm kinematics. Representative results showed that there was a significant increase in movement duration, movement jerkiness, and trunk compensation as a function of task complexity, but not task difficulty in all participants. Chronic stroke survivors showed significantly slower, jerkier, and more feedback-dependent arm reaches and significantly more compensatory trunk movements than non-disabled adults. Our representative results support that this protocol can be used to investigate the impact of task conditions on motor control strategies in chronic stroke survivors with mild UE motor impairment.

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