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The impact of the EU neonicotinoid seed-dressing ban on oilseed rape production in England.

Authors
  • Scott, Charles1
  • Bilsborrow, Paul E2
  • 1 Farm Business Survey, School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
  • 2 School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pest Management Science
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2019
Volume
75
Issue
1
Pages
125–133
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/ps.5189
PMID: 30152140
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Neonicotinoid seed dressings on oilseed rape were banned in the European Union (EU) from December 2013. A survey of > 200 farms was conducted in England in the 2014/15 and 2015/16 seasons to assess the impact of the ban on changes in crop area, crop losses to cabbage stem flea beetle (CSFB), insecticide use and the economics of oilseed rape production. The area of oilseed rape grown fell in both seasons, with CSFB identified as the third most important reason for the decrease. Crop losses to CSFB were 3% and 5% in the respective seasons, with clear variation by county. There were clear differences in the crop area treated (1.14 vs 0.77 million ha) and the number of insecticide applications per crop (2.0 vs 1.4) to combat CSFB in 2014/15 and 2015/16, respectively. Within the derogation area counties there was a clear reduction in the number of applications per crop when neonicotinoid-treated vs non-treated seed was used (1.0 vs 1.9), respectively. Increasing resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in combination with the neonicotinoid seed dressing ban is likely to have significant impacts on the viability of growing oilseed rape in England particularly where CSFB activity/risk is high. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

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