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The impact of community-based multimedia intervention on the new and repeated cervical cancer screening participation among South Asian women.

Authors
  • Chan, D N S1
  • So, W K W2
  • 1 The Nethersole School of Nursing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 2 The Nethersole School of Nursing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Public health
Publication Date
Oct 05, 2019
Volume
178
Pages
1–4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2019.08.015
PMID: 31593783
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to reveal the screening uptake of South Asian women who had participated in the community-based multimedia intervention and to identify the reasons among those women who remained unscreened after receiving the intervention. This was a cross-sectional study. South Asian women (Indian, Pakistani and Nepalese) who had attended a community-based multimedia intervention and who agreed to participate in a follow-up telephone survey were contacted. A structured telephone survey was conducted to collect data on their screening uptake status. There were altogether 371 women who completed the survey. Before attending the intervention, 220 of them had never had a Pap test. After the intervention, 75 of those 220 women (34.1%) decided to attend screening, of which 43 underwent their first Pap test, while 32 made their first Pap test appointment. Among those 151 women who previously underwent screening, 76 of them completed the screening or had scheduled a repeated test. Perceived barriers to screening such as lack of time, language barriers and perception that it was unnecessary to attend screening remained the major reasons for women who were not screened. Some South Asian women started to have their first Pap test, while some continued to attend screening after the intervention. As barriers that affect women's screening participation still exist, continuous and sustainable efforts should be made to improve the overall screening uptake. Copyright © 2019 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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