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Immunology of COVID-19 and disease-modifying therapies: The good, the bad and the unknown.

Authors
  • Zrzavy, Tobias1
  • Wimmer, Isabella1
  • Rommer, Paulus S1
  • Berger, Thomas1
  • 1 Department of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. , (Austria)
Type
Published Article
Journal
European journal of neurology
Publication Date
Oct 08, 2020
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/ene.14578
PMID: 33090599
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The outbreak of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, caused by a previously unknown infectious agent, posed unprecedented challenges to healthcare systems and unmasked their vulnerability and limitations worldwide. Patients with long-term immunomodulatory/suppressive therapies, as well as their physicians, were and are concerned about balancing the risk of infection and effects of disease-modifying therapy. Over the last few months, knowledge regarding SARS-CoV-2 has been growing tremendously, and the first experiences of infections in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have been reported. This review summarizes the currently still limited knowledge about SARS-CoV-2 immunology and the commonly agreed modes of action of approved drugs in immune-mediated diseases of the central nervous system (MS and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder). Specifically, we discuss whether immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory drugs may increase the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and, conversely, may decrease the severity of a COVID-19 disease course. At present, it can be recommended in general that none of those therapies with a definite indication needs to be stopped per se. A possibly increased risk of infection for most medications is accompanied by the possibility to reduce the severity of COVID-19. Despite the knowledge gain over the last few months, current evidence remains limited, and, thus, further clinical vigilance and systematic documentation is essential. © 2020 The Authors. European Journal of Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Academy of Neurology.

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