Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Immunodominant SARS Coronavirus Epitopes in Humans Elicited both Enhancing and Neutralizing Effects on Infection in Non-human Primates.

Authors
  • Wang, Qidi1
  • Zhang, Lianfeng2
  • Kuwahara, Kazuhiko3
  • Li, Li1
  • Liu, Zijie1
  • Li, Taisheng4
  • Zhu, Hua2
  • Liu, Jiangning2
  • Xu, Yanfeng2
  • Xie, Jing4
  • Morioka, Hiroshi3
  • Sakaguchi, Nobuo3, 5
  • Qin, Chuan2
  • Liu, Gang6, 1
  • 1 Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College , 2A Nanwei Road, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100050, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 2 Institute of Laboratory Animal Science, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College , Beijing 100021, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 3 Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University , 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 4 Department of Infectious Disease, Peking Union Medical College Hospital and AIDS Research Center, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College , Beijing 100071, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 5 WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University , 3-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 6 Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences & School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tsinghua University , Haidian District, Beijing 100084, People's Republic of China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
ACS Infectious Diseases
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Publication Date
May 13, 2016
Volume
2
Issue
5
Pages
361–376
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1021/acsinfecdis.6b00006
PMID: 27627203
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is caused by a coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and has the potential to threaten global public health and socioeconomic stability. Evidence of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of SARS-CoV infection in vitro and in non-human primates clouds the prospects for a safe vaccine. Using antibodies from SARS patients, we identified and characterized SARS-CoV B-cell peptide epitopes with disparate functions. In rhesus macaques, the spike glycoprotein peptides S471-503, S604-625, and S1164-1191 elicited antibodies that efficiently prevented infection in non-human primates. In contrast, peptide S597-603 induced antibodies that enhanced infection both in vitro and in non-human primates by using an epitope sequence-dependent (ESD) mechanism. This peptide exhibited a high level of serological reactivity (64%), which resulted from the additive responses of two tandem epitopes (S597-603 and S604-625) and a long-term human B-cell memory response with antisera from convalescent SARS patients. Thus, peptide-based vaccines against SARS-CoV could be engineered to avoid ADE via elimination of the S597-603 epitope. We provide herein an alternative strategy to prepare a safe and effective vaccine for ADE of viral infection by identifying and eliminating epitope sequence-dependent enhancement of viral infection.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times