Affordable Access

Access to the full text

The immune system in cancer metastasis: friend or foe?

Authors
  • Janssen, Louise M.E.1
  • Ramsay, Emma E.2
  • Logsdon, Craig D.2
  • Overwijk, Willem W.1, 3
  • 1 The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Departments of Melanoma Medical Oncology, Houston, TX, USA , Houston (United States)
  • 2 The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Cancer Biology, Houston, TX, USA , Houston (United States)
  • 3 The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX, USA , Houston (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Oct 17, 2017
Volume
5
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s40425-017-0283-9
Source
Springer Nature
License
Green

Abstract

Metastatic disease is the leading cause of death among cancer patients and involves a complex and inefficient process. Every step of the metastatic process can be rate limiting and is influenced by non-malignant host cells interacting with the tumor cell. Over a century ago, experiments first indicated a link between the immune system and metastasis. This phenomenon, called concomitant immunity, indicates that the primary tumor induces an immune response, which may not be sufficient to destroy the primary tumor, but prevents the growth of a secondary tumor or metastases. Since that time, many different immune cells have been shown to play a role in both inhibiting and promoting metastatic disease. Here we review classic and new observations, describing the links between the immune system and metastasis that inform the development of cancer therapies.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times