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Immobilization stress responses in adult rats exposed in utero to immobilization.

Authors
  • Mayer, Nora1
  • Greco, Cecilia
  • Bertuzzi, Mabel
  • Rodriguez, Nancy
  • Vivas, Adriana
  • Gauna, Hector
  • 1 Departamento de Biología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Físico-Químicas y Naturales y, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Río Cuarto, Córdoba, Argentina. , (Argentina)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Stress and health : journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2011
Volume
27
Issue
2
Identifiers
PMID: 27486619
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The present study investigated the influence of immobilization prenatal stress on adult male rats, with the same postnatal stress, on the immune parameters and its relation with plasma corticosterone (COR) and glucose levels. To study the immunity parameters, profiles of the leucocytes, size of spleen and number of the mononuclear cells of this organ were determined. Basal levels of COR and glucose were higher in prenatally stressed animals. When the adult animals were exposed to immobilization stress, COR increased but the increase was less than that for the control group, and glucose was equal in both groups. Although postnatal acute stress decreased the number of leucocytes and lymphocytes and increased the number of neutrophils, the effect was lower in prenatally stressed animals; for that reason, the ratio neutrophil/lymphocyte increased less. The number of mononuclear cells were higher in the spleen of prenatally stressed animals. This effect was probably due to retention of blood lymphocytes in the spleen. There seemed to be an alteration in the redistribution of leucocytes, both in basal conditions and under postnatal stress. The alteration of the immunological function may be partly due to an alteration in the functionality of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which was hyperactive in basal conditions but appeared to suffer habituation to the same stress.

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