Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Immediate-early gene expression in the brain of the thiamine-deficient rat

Authors
  • Hazell, Alan S.1
  • McGahan, Lynda2, 3
  • Tetzlaff, Wolfram4
  • Bedard, Annie M.4
  • Robertson, George S.2
  • Nakabeppu, Yusaku5
  • Hakim, Antoine M.3
  • 1 McGill University, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal, Quebec , Montreal
  • 2 University of Ottawa, Department of Pharmacology, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada , Ottawa
  • 3 University of Ottawa, Neuroscience Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada , Ottawa
  • 4 University of Ottawa, Department of Physiology, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada , Ottawa
  • 5 Kuyshu University 69, Department of Biochemistry, Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Fukuoka, 812, Japan , Fukuoka
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Molecular Neuroscience
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Feb 01, 1998
Volume
10
Issue
1
Pages
1–15
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/BF02737081
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) in the rat is associated with neuronal loss in the thalamus and inferior colliculus. Recently, we were able to demonstrate the occurrence of apoptosis in the thalamus of these animals. Given that immediate-early genes (IEGs) participate in signal transduction pathways that mediate programmed cell death, the present study utilizedin situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to examine the expression of four IEGs (c-fos, c-jun,fos-B, and NGFI-A) during the progression of PTD. Elevated c-fos mRNA levels were initially observed in the posterior medial thalamus on d 12 of the deficiency. At the acute symptomatic stage (characterized by a loss of righting reflex on d 16–17), the posterior-medial thalamus exhibited increased mRNA for all genes examined, whereas the inferior colliculus demonstrated mRNA induction for c-fos, c-jun, and NGFI-A. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that elevations of IEG mRNA associated with the acute symptomatic stage were consistently translated into protein in the thalamus. In contrast, whereas elevated Fos- and Jun-like immunoreactivity were detected in the inferior colliculus at this stage, NGFI-A-like immunoreactivity declined significantly below basal levels, suggesting a translational block. These results are consistent with our recent findings of apoptotic cell death, and indicate that differential patterns of IEG expression occur in the thalamus and inferior colliculus during PTD, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of this disorder.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times