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Imbalanced dietary patterns, anthropometric, and body composition profiles amongst adults with Down syndrome.

Authors
  • Herrera-Quintana, L1
  • Vázquez-Lorente, H1
  • Carranco Romo, M J1
  • Flores Buitrón, E P1
  • Molina-López, J2
  • Moya, M T3
  • Planells, E1
  • 1 Department of Physiology, School of Pharmacy, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology "José Mataix", University of Granada, Granada, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 2 Faculty of Education, Psychology and Sports Sciences, University of Huelva, Huelva, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 3 GranaDown, Down Syndrome Association of Granada, Granada, Spain. , (Spain)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nutritional Neuroscience
Publisher
Maney Publishing
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2024
Volume
27
Issue
2
Pages
96–105
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/1028415X.2022.2161139
PMID: 36579765
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Introduction: We aimed to analyze the anthropometric and body composition profiles of Down syndrome (DS) adults; to describe their dietary habits, nutrient intake, and physical activity patterns; and to identify the related risk factors which may influence their health status and quality of life.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a cohort of 23 DS adults (45% women) aged 21-44 years. Anthropometry and body composition were assessed by bioelectrical impedance. Dietary nutrient intake was assessed quantitatively using a 72-h recall. A food frequency questionnaire and the prevention with Mediterranean diet-PREDIMED questionnaire were used for qualitative rating.Results: Higher fat mass (FM) and lower lean mass (LM), bone mass (BM), and waist to hip ratio (WHR) were observed in women compared to men. LM and BM decreased, and body mass index (BMI), FM, and WHR increased with aging (all P < 0.05). Vitamin D and iodine intakes were not met by 70% and 60% of the studied participants, respectively. A total of 82% of the participants consumed less than 5 portions of fruits and vegetables per day and overconsumed food groups such as sweets and snacks and red meat (> 2 times per week). Protein intake showed a significant positive correlation with height (r = 0.489, P < 0.05), whereas fat intake was positively correlated with sweets and snacks (r = 0.521, P < 0.05).Conclusion: The present findings support the existence of poor anthropometric and body composition profiles, and diet quality, underscoring the need for an interdisciplinary team assessment to enhance health and quality of life in DS adults.

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