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Imaging Pathway of a Pediatric Patient with Succinate Dehydrogenase B-Deficient Paraganglioma.

Authors
  • Edmonds, Stephen1
  • Davidson, Jennifer1, 2
  • Joseph, Rosanne1
  • Vyas, Madhusudan3, 4
  • 1 Mercy Radiology, Auckland, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 2 Auckland Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand; and. , (New Zealand)
  • 3 Mercy Radiology, Auckland, New Zealand; [email protected]. , (New Zealand)
  • 4 Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Publisher
Society of Nuclear Medicine
Publication Date
Dec 05, 2023
Volume
51
Issue
4
Pages
318–322
Identifiers
DOI: 10.2967/jnmt.123.265655
PMID: 37699643
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma are rare in children, at only 1 in every 50,000 cases. Even though some cases are sporadic, they have been connected to syndromes such as von Hippel-Lindau, multiple endocrine neoplasia types IIa and IIb, neurofibromatosis type 1, and hereditary pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma syndromes. A genetic mutation causes around 60% of pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas in children under 18. Methods: A 15-y-old child with a 6-y history of back discomfort is presented. The justification for using 2 functional imaging modalities, 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT and 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine SPECT/CT, is examined in this case study. We reviewed the patients' journey since the first referral for imaging. Results: Delaying the molecular imaging modalities has affected patients' overall diagnosis and applied treatment outcomes. Conclusion: This case study investigates the potential for the earlier use of various diagnostic modalities in conjunction with diagnostic testing to facilitate an earlier diagnosis. However, since this study is based solely on imaging and lacks access to the patient's clinical or family history, factors such as potential inequities in health-care facilities, health literacy, and socioeconomic status are not addressed. It is essential to acknowledge these influences as they contribute to the inequitable access to health-care settings in New Zealand. © 2023 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

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