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Imaging optical fields below metal films and metal-dielectric waveguides by a scanning microscope.

Authors
  • Zhu, Liangfu1
  • Wang, Yong1
  • Zhang, Douguo1
  • Wang, Ruxue1
  • Qiu, Dong1
  • Wang, Pei1
  • Ming, Hai1
  • Badugu, Ramachandram2
  • Rosenfeld, Mary2
  • Lakowicz, Joseph R2
  • 1 Department of Optics and Optical Engineering, Institute of Photonics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China. , (China)
  • 2 Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 725 West Lombard St., Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Applied Physics
Publisher
AIP Publishing
Publication Date
Sep 21, 2017
Volume
122
Issue
11
Pages
113101–113101
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1063/1.5002071
PMID: 30443078
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy (LSCM) is now an important method for tissue and cell imaging when the samples are located on the surfaces of glass slides. In the past decade, there has been extensive development of nano-optical structures that display unique effects on incident and transmitted light, which will be used with novel configurations for medical and consumer products. For these applications, it is necessary to characterize the light distribution within short distances from the structures for efficient detection and elimination of bulky optical components. These devices will minimize or possibly eliminate the need for free-space light propagation outside of the device itself. We describe the use of the scanning function of a LSCM to obtain 3D images of the light intensities below the surface of nano-optical structures. More specifically, we image the spatial distributions inside the substrate of fluorescence emission coupled to waveguide modes after it leaks through thin metal films or dielectric-coated metal films. The observed spatial distribution were in general agreement with far-field calculations, but the scanning images also revealed light intensities at angles not observed with classical back focal plane imaging. Knowledge of the subsurface optical intensities will be crucial in the combination of nano-optical structures with rapidly evolving imaging detectors.

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