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Image cytometry of cyclin D1: a prognostic marker for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

Authors
  • Liu, S C
  • Zhang, S Y
  • Babb, J S
  • Ridge, J A
  • Klein-Szanto, A J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Publication Date
May 01, 2001
Volume
10
Issue
5
Pages
455–459
Identifiers
PMID: 11352854
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

CCND1 gene amplification and cyclin D1 protein overexpression are indicators for poor prognosis in invasive head and neck carcinomas. Increased CCND1 gene dosage is a more sensitive prognostic factor than protein overexpression as evaluated by conventional immunohistochemical techniques. Qualitative immunohistochemistry cannot distinguish cyclin D1 overexpression accompanied by amplification of the CCND1 gene from overexpression associated with normal CCND1 gene copy number. To improve the sensitivity of cyclin D1 protein determination, we applied quantitative techniques of image analysis to evaluate cyclin D1 in 54 head and neck carcinomas. There was a significantly higher rate of occurrence of adverse events (P = 0.043) among patients with CCND1 gene amplification than among those without gene amplification. There was a strong association between CCND1 gene amplification (as detected by Southern blot analysis) and the highest nuclear score (by image cytometry of the immunostained tumor sections). The predominance of cells in the lowest nuclear score category was significantly associated with normal copy number (P = 0.005). Conversely, the highest nuclear score was a significant predictor of gene dosage (P = 0.02). Similarly, high nuclear score was a good predictor of death as the final outcome of the disease (P = 0.01). Although somewhat less accurate than Southern blotting, image cytometry of immunohistochemical cyclin D1 stain appears to be a promising tool that could be useful for other tumor marker expression studies.

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