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Are Illness Perceptions Associated with Pain and Disability in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome? A Cross-Sectional Study.

Authors
  • Antunovich, Dana R1
  • Horne, Juliette C2
  • Tuck, Natalie L2, 3, 4
  • Bean, Debbie J1, 2, 3, 4
  • 1 Department of Psychological Medicine, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 2 The Auckland Regional Pain Service, Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 3 Health and Rehabilitation Research Institute, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 4 Chronic Pain Service, Department of Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, Waitematā District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
Publication Date
Feb 04, 2021
Volume
22
Issue
1
Pages
100–111
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/pm/pnaa320
PMID: 33029630
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a complex and often poorly understood condition, and people with CRPS will have diverse beliefs about their symptoms. According to the self-regulation model, these beliefs (termed "illness perceptions") influence health behaviors and outcomes. Previous studies have found that psychological factors influence CRPS outcomes, but few studies have investigated CRPS patients' illness perceptions specifically. The present study examined whether illness perceptions were related to pain intensity and other relevant outcomes in people with CRPS. In this cross-sectional study, 53 patients with CRPS (type 1 and type 2) completed questionnaires assessing illness perceptions, pain, disability, and psychological factors. Multiple regression analyses were used to determine whether illness perceptions were associated with pain intensity, disability, depression, and kinesiophobia, after controlling for possible covariates (including clinical and demographic factors, pain catastrophizing, and negative affect). Negative illness perceptions were associated with greater pain, disability, and kinesiophobia, but not depression. Specifically, attributing more symptoms to CRPS (more negative illness identity perceptions) was associated with greater pain intensity, and reporting a poorer understanding of CRPS (lower illness coherence scores) was associated with greater disability and kinesiophobia. Patients with CRPS with more negative illness perceptions (particularly perceptions indicating a poor understanding of their condition) also experience greater pain, disability, and kinesiophobia. Future research could investigate whether altering CRPS patients' illness perceptions influences clinical outcomes. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]

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