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Identifying Differences Between Cut Marks Made on Bone by a Machete and Katana: A Pilot Study.

Authors
  • McCardle, Penny1
  • Stojanovski, Elizabeth2
  • 1 Faculty of Health, Department of Forensic Medicine Newcastle, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callighan, NSW 2308, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callighan, NSW 2308, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of forensic sciences
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2018
Volume
63
Issue
6
Pages
1813–1818
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/1556-4029.13754
PMID: 29464702
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The aim of this research was to identify characteristics specific to a machete and katana on three different bone types. One machete and two katanas were used to produce cut marks on Sus scrofa rib, flat and long bones. Fifty-nine cuts were produced by the katanas and 38 by the machete. The presence of flaking, feathering, peeling, micropeeling, chattering, microcurvature, scoop defect, and exit notch was noted, and bivariate associations between each characteristic and weapon type were assessed using Pearson's chi-square tests for independence and logistic regression models developed. Significant predictors for machete cut marks are scoop defect for rib bones (correct classification 93%), micropeeling in flat bones, chattering on flat and long bones (all p < 001) and for the katana, microcurvature (p < 004) and exit notch on flat and long bones (p < 001; correct classification 96% and 100%, respectively). The identified bivariate associations and final logistic regression models may be utilized in forensic investigations when identifying hacking trauma. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

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