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Identification of Umami Taste in Sous-Vide Beef by Chemical Analyses, Equivalent Umami Concentration, and Electronic Tongue System

Authors
  • Hwang, Young-Hwa
  • Ismail, Ishamri1
  • Joo, Seon-Tea
  • 1 Faculty of Bioresources and Food Industry, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Besut Campus, Terengganu 22200, Malaysia
Type
Published Article
Journal
Foods
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Feb 26, 2020
Volume
9
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/foods9030251
PMID: 32110974
PMCID: PMC7143247
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Behaviour of umami compounds that are associated with non-volatile compounds on slow cooking regimes remains less explored. This study aims to assess the ability of the electronic tongue system on the umami taste from sous-vide beef semitendinosus . The identification was based on the taste-enhancing synergism between umami compounds 5’-nucleotides (IMP, GMP, AMP, inosine, and hypoxanthine) and free amino acids (glutamic and aspartic acid) using the estimation of equivalent umami concentration (EUC) and electronic tongue system. Sous-vide cooked at 60 and 70 °C for 6 and 12 h and cooked using the conventional method at 70 °C for 30 min (as control) were compared. The temperature had a significant effect on 5’-nucleotides, but aspartic and glutamic acid were not influenced by any treatments applied. Sous-vide cooked at 60 °C tended to have higher inosine and hypoxanthine. Meanwhile, desirable 5’-nucleotides IMP, AMP, and GMP were more intensified at the temperature of 70 °C. The principal component analysis predicted a good correlation between EUC and the electronic tongue, with sous-vide at 70 °C for 12 h presenting the most umami. Therefore, the electronic tongue system is a useful tool in food processing, particularly in determining complex sensory properties such as umami, which cannot be evaluated objectively.

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