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Identification of the occluded artery in patients with myocardial ischemia induced by prolonged percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty using traditional vs transformed ECG-based indexes.

Authors
  • García, J
  • Wagner, G
  • Sömmo, L
  • Lander, P
  • Laguna, P
Type
Published Article
Journal
Computers and biomedical research, an international journal
Publication Date
Oct 01, 1999
Volume
32
Issue
5
Pages
470–482
Identifiers
PMID: 10529303
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

We have studied the spatial properties of ischemic changes as induced by prolonged angioplasty and how the changes are related to different ECG indexes. Indexes based on measurements at specific points in time (ST level at J + 60 ms point, maximal T wave amplitude and position, QT interval, and QRS duration) and global indexes (based on the Karhunen-Loève transform and applied to the QRS complex, ST-T complex, ST segment, and T wave), considering both repolarization and depolarization information, were analyzed. The changes during the occlusion period of the different indexes were used as variables in a multivariate discriminant analysis to determine which indexes showed the best discrimination of the three major occlusion sites (corresponding to LAD, RCA, and LCX coronary arteries). Occlusions in LCX artery were the most difficult to classify. With three local indexes (ST60 level measured in lead V3, T wave amplitude in I, and ST60 in III) it was possible to correctly classify 76% of patients by the occlusion site, and with three KLT-derived indexes (first-order KLT index for ST-T complex in I and for QRS in leads V3 and I) 83% of correct classification was obtained. Using six indexes for local and KLT-derived indexes the correct classification was increased to 85 and 90% of patients, respectively. The use of different ECG indexes (from different intervals) on quasiorthogonal leads permitted the identification of the occluded artery in patients undergoing PTCA and may be extended to more general use.

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