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I wanted it as soon as possible: a qualitative exploration of reactions to access to same-day ART start among participants in San Diego's ART-NET project.

Authors
  • Amico, K Rivet1
  • Miller, Jessica1
  • Schairer, Cynthia2
  • Gianella, Sara3
  • Little, Susan J3
  • Hoenigl, Martin3
  • 1 Department of Health Behavior Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
  • 2 Department of Psychiatry, San Diego School of Medicine, University of California, La Jolla, CA, USA.
  • 3 Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS care
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
32
Issue
9
Pages
1191–1197
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09540121.2019.1687831
PMID: 31713432
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Rapid start of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is quickly becoming best practice around the world. In the US, programs exist to facilitate rapid ART start, but little is known about the experiences of newly diagnosed individuals receiving these recommendations and services. Twenty participants (19 men who have sex with men and 1 transgender woman) from an early ART start program were interviewed to better understand these experiences. Interviews were analyzed for main themes in three general areas: reasons to start, reasons to delay, and factors influencing early ART adherence. Participants reported starting anywhere from right away (same visit as diagnosis) to within a few weeks (median 10.5 days). Reasons to start right away included fear of what could happen if not treated, personal health, influence of people/resources at the clinic, and study participation. Most had small delays in ART start because of structural (insurance, costs) and intentional delays (getting additional medical consultations). Adherence facilitators included desires to improve CD4/viral load and positive beliefs in benefits of suppression. Participants were largely supportive of rapid ART start and appeared to rely on CD4/viral load as "proof" of need for ART, which may be particularly helpful for asymptomatic, newly diagnosed individuals starting ART.

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