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I am the person who knows myself best: Perception on shared decision-making among hospitalized people diagnosed with schizophrenia in China.

Authors
  • Huang, Chongmei1
  • Plummer, Virginia2
  • Wang, Yun3, 4
  • Lam, Louisa5
  • Cross, Wendy5
  • 1 School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 Nursing and Midwifery Research, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University and Peninsula Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Department of Medicine, Central Clinical School, Peninsula Clinical School, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Academic Unit, Frankston Hospital, Peninsula Health, Frankston, Victoria, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 5 School of Nursing and Healthcare Professions, Federation University Australia, Mount Helen, Victoria, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
29
Issue
5
Pages
846–855
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/inm.12718
PMID: 32250036
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Shared decision-making is related to better health outcomes in serious mental illness. It is not well addressed in non-Western cultures, for example Chinese culture. Chinese could be influenced by both paternalism and familism when making treatment decisions. However, this is unexplored. The study purpose is to explore shared decision-making from perspectives of inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia in China. This study adopted qualitative descriptive approach. Through semi-structured interviews, twelve participants from the psychiatry department of a tertiary hospital shared their perceptions of shared decision-making. An inductive thematic approach was used to analyse the transcripts. Primary results included three main themes with nine subthemes: (1) Having a positive attitude: i) wanting my voice to be heard, ii) needing my family to be involved, and iii) preferring the psychiatrist to decide; (2) Feeling excluded: i) having limited financial capacity, ii) lacking interactive communication, iii) too few psychiatrists, and iv) being unsatisfied with informed consent process; and (3) Self-motivation in decision-making by: i) easing the burden on the family and ii) actively collecting health information. In this context, patients have fewer treatment options and a limited role in SDM. Yet, they have preference for SDM, actively seeking health information from mental health professionals particularly nurses. © 2020 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

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